Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Vaccination’ Category

By: Sophie Mazur

Likely, you have all heard of malaria and its association to high mortality rates. However, most people have not heard of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) although it is the second most prevalent cause of death during infancy (RSViNetwork, n.d.). Unlike malaria, there is no effective treatment for RSV. Similar to many global health problems, the likelihood of serious disease and death due to this virus is compounded due to poverty, lack of access to proper treatment and care, and lack of awareness. As this virus continues to infect children globally at an alarming rate, we must direct attention towards educating families and health practitioners to identify the infection. As well as, prioritize efforts to cerate an effective and affordable vaccine and treatment.

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

By: Timothy Jennings

Japan’s healthcare system is often touted as one of the best in the world. They have one of the highest life expectancies, one of the lowest maternal mortality rates, and the second lowest infant mortality rate. Japan accomplishes this with relatively low healthcare expenditure per capita and a national insurer, known as the Statutory Health Insurance System, which provides universal primary coverage. It is thus exciting to hear about new treatments coming out of this world class system. In a recently published Forbes article, it was announced that Xofluza, a new influenza treatment, was approved in Japan. The groundbreaking factor about this drug is that it has been shown to kill the flu virus in 24 hours in clinical trials in both Japanese and American patients. This was compared to three days for the standard treatment of Tamiflu. The pharmaceutical company responsible, Shionogi, claims that this will reduce transmission of influenza and limit morbidity and mortality from the illness. Because of this, Xofluza has been given fast-tracked approval in Japan and should be released later this year. In the United States and other countries, additional approval is required with estimates of a 2019 release.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

BY: Victoria Gao 

Once every four years, countries around the world get ready for the Winter Olympics, a multi-sport event where athletes compete against each other to show the world who is best. Amidst the rivalry between nations, they all share one common opponent, the dreaded common cold.

This year’s flu season has been extraordinarily bad. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), out of 100,000 hospitalizations in the US, 22.7 were for the flu only in the first week of January. On the other hand, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), there were 1,250 confirmed flu cases in South Korea between December 4 and January 28. The number of flu cases exceed the CDC’s threshold and is considered an epidemic almost every year. So, what makes the flu this bad? The flu virus is an airborne virus and with so many athletes coming together in one area to celebrate the sports, it will be extremely difficult to stop the virus from spreading. There would be more people and therefore more chances for the flu to transmit from person to person. PyeongChang would become a paradise for the virus.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By: Gopika Das

India is home to 1.3 billion people, accounting for 17.5% of the world’s population . It is also home to 27% of deaths caused by cervical cancer worldwide (Cousins 2018). Despite cervical cancer having the best chances of secondary prevention, it remains a leading cause of female mortality globally. The burden of the disease is especially heightened in developing countries like India and Pakistan. In India, lack of the HPV vaccine in governmental immunisation programs and inadequate access to screening for the disease, are major contributors to the extremely high incidence rate.

It is agreed that the HPV vaccine along with early screening for cervical cancer, can prevent upto 70 percent of new cases (Swaminathan 2016). The HPV vaccine has been approved for use since 2006, and as of 2017, 71 countries have included it in their vaccine programs. India however has been extremely reluctant. While the government has severely dragged its feet on providing adequate resources, societally there is a negative association with the vaccine. In 2009 funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates foundation, the NGO PATH, launched a $3.6 million HPV program. However within a year, there was an uproar over the deaths of seven girls following the vaccine, effectively halting the program. Despite officials declaring that the deaths were not caused by the vaccine, people got scared and the aversion to the vaccine stuck.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Heba Ijaz

Since Nigeria was declared endemic-free last year, Pakistan has become one of two remaining countries where polio is still an endemic viral infection.

Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by the poliovirus that primarily affects children. The virus spreads mainly through the fecal-oral route, although transmission through oral and nasal secretions can also occur. It resides mainly in the throat and intestines, and in certain cases, can enter the bloodstream to invade the brain and spinal cord, leading to paralysis. Contaminated water and food sources along with poor personal hygiene are significant contributors to polio transmission. Two types of vaccines are available today: Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) is a live attenuated version and Intravenous Polio Vaccine (IPV) is an inactivated version. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Maria Paez

At the beginning of the week I read an article in the New York Time titled HPV Sharply Reduced in Teenage Girls Following Vaccine, Study Says, and was pleasantly surprised. But the statistics lingered in my mind. Yes it was great! But I am sure that lower prevalence rates would be easily attainable if the vaccine achieved higher immunization rates or was mandatory. It is incredible that scientists have gotten so far in cancer research and, although still uncertain, the so desired “cure” might not be impossible.

I find it rather contradictory that we, Americans, hope for a cure for cancer yet we fail to embrace a vaccine that can prevent multiple forms of cancer like cervical. (more…)

Read Full Post »