Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Smoking’ Category

By Mahra Weber

We’re all familiar with the phrase “it’s 5 o’clock somewhere”. It’s an anthem, calling for adults to unwind and reward themselves after a long day at work. Drinking alcohol is a prominent social component of many cultures. However, anything in excess usually produces bad results. In a recent Reuters article titled “Alcohol-linked deaths a problem for the Americas”, alcohol is discussed as a cause of many premature deaths in the US, Canada, and areas of Central America and South America. In the US, where the legal drinking age is 21 years of age, there is an emphasis on the dangers of underage drinking. The article takes a different view, emphasizing the effects of many years of drinking throughout life. Years of excessive alcohol consumption can lead to liver failure, gastric problems, and neurotoxicity. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Nina Roth 

The United States has made great strides in tobacco prevention, but does this hold true for the rest of the world? Unfortunately, the answer is no. Tobacco kills around 6million people worldwide every year, and that number is projected to increase.1 Due to the shrinking demand for tobacco products in the United States over the last few decades, big tobacco companies have had to look elsewhere for profits. Conveniently, tobacco companies have found emerging markets in many developing, highly populous countries in Asia. Research on tobacco trends has concluded that over the next twenty years 70 percent of tobacco related deaths will be in these less developed countries.2 This is in part due to less stringent tobacco laws and governmental regulations, lack of education and awareness, and heavy advertising from tobacco companies.

So, why should we care? Let me introduce the case of Indonesia. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Melissa Chan

The United States has seen a decline in the number of tobacco smokers to about 20% of the US population, mostly due to the high state and federal excise taxes. The average price for a pack of cigarettes increased to $5.62 in 2011, and is even higher now3.  With this fall in consumption and profit for tobacco companies in most of the world’s rich developed countries, the industry has set their target on the emerging and developing countries of Asia. What makes the Asia-Pacific region so attractive to tobacco companies? It was less damaged by the recent financial crisis and some countries actually experienced significant economic growth.  With relatively unregulated tobacco markets, advertising to the public is much easier.  Only six out of the eleven South-East Asian countries have any sort of legislation requiring health warnings on tobacco products, and they fall far below the level of best-practice standards around the world4.  Adding to the problem is the conscious effort of big tobacco companies to hamper anti-advertising legislation from being passed.  Recently, four big tobacco companies challenged Australia’s efforts to pass tobacco packaging laws, but the case was dismissed and public health gained a huge victory5(more…)

Read Full Post »

Read Full Post »

“Cancer killed 5.56 lakh in India in 2010.” The title was so absurd you have to double take. One lakh of people, for those who don’t know, is approximately 100,000 people. Sure enough, in 2010, over 5 hundred thousand people died from cancer in India, according to The Hindu, one of India’s most widely read newspapers. Among these numbers, the greatest cause of death among men was tobacco-related cancers. How can the most widespread killer be those cancers most avoidable? (more…)

Read Full Post »

The Harvard University School of Public Health recently released an article discussing the relationship between smoking during pregnancy and the child’s risk of developing a long-term criminal record. The study concludes that the children of mothers who smoked have a 30% increased chance of being arrested as adults, with no difference between genders. The offspring also have an increased chance of being repeat-offenders. Possible explanations include that exposure to cigarette smoke while in the womb may harm developing brain areas related to behavior, attention, and impulse control. (more…)

Read Full Post »