Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘pharmaceuticals’ Category

By: Pei-Hsuan Li

Kari Whitehead started to gradually notice something different about her daughter, Emily. Not long after seeing purple bruises on her legs, bleeding gums, bloody noses, and severe leg pains, Emily was diagnosed with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) on May 28, 2010 when she was only five years old.

Emily received the standard treatment for ALL but relapsed after 16 months. Fortunately for the Whitehead’s, news appeared of a new and innovative drug called Kymriah. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the opening of the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trial early. Emily became Patient 1 of the Phase 1 trial. Now she is 12 years old, and she has remained in complete remission since her seventh birthday. Last year, oFollowing Kymriah, on October 18, 2017, Yescarta, a treatment for adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma developed by Kite Pharma, was approved as the second FDA-approved gene therapy. Price listed: $373,000.

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

By: Timothy Jennings

Japan’s healthcare system is often touted as one of the best in the world. They have one of the highest life expectancies, one of the lowest maternal mortality rates, and the second lowest infant mortality rate. Japan accomplishes this with relatively low healthcare expenditure per capita and a national insurer, known as the Statutory Health Insurance System, which provides universal primary coverage. It is thus exciting to hear about new treatments coming out of this world class system. In a recently published Forbes article, it was announced that Xofluza, a new influenza treatment, was approved in Japan. The groundbreaking factor about this drug is that it has been shown to kill the flu virus in 24 hours in clinical trials in both Japanese and American patients. This was compared to three days for the standard treatment of Tamiflu. The pharmaceutical company responsible, Shionogi, claims that this will reduce transmission of influenza and limit morbidity and mortality from the illness. Because of this, Xofluza has been given fast-tracked approval in Japan and should be released later this year. In the United States and other countries, additional approval is required with estimates of a 2019 release.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

By Lauren Fisher

According to the Washington Post, “prescription painkillers grease a slippery slope toward a relapse for former heroin addicts.” The death of Philip Seymour Hoffman is perhaps one of the most viral news stories of 2014 thus far, and indeed appears to be a case in point. I will be the first to admit that I initially had no remorse for the late actor, known for his former heroin use and found dead with a needle still in his arm. Despite inconclusive toxicology results, I assumed that like many other celebrities, Hoffman simply partied much too hard, leaving disheveled and mourning loved ones behind to deal with the aftermath of his actions.

As investigations ensued, more and more information regarding Hoffman’s incessant drug use surfaced. It was revealed that the actor, 46, had been taking prescription opioids, which include the addictive drugs OxyCotin, Vicoden, and Percocet. Hoffman then again turned to heroin – much cheaper than a pharmaceutical – typically $10 a packet for heroin compared with nearly $80 on the street for an 80-milligram of OxyCotin. These behaviors reflect those of a true addict, and so my initial callousness to the case morphed into sympathy. Though others tend to disagree, I believe addiction is a disease. Those individuals suffering must be provided help – medical, legal, and emotional – in order to live a healthy, normal life. If not tended to adequately, disease often results in death, yet common mental health diseases such as addiction are often stigmatized and overlooked. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Meredith White

I read an article on NPR News about the Blue Ribbon Panel urging for pharmaceuticals around the globe to fight the selling of counterfeit and substandard drugs. These drugs are a problem both in developing countries and in the Western world. You can Google various prescription medications online and find a way to purchase it. The truth is most of these are fake or made by someone unqualified to do so. They are often mixed with other ingredients to make it cheaper, which can be harmful to the consumer.  In the developing world they could be sold illegally on the street, in markets. Those selling these drugs might not have any education on the subject.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

90% of pharmaceutical research accounts for just 10% of the global burden of disease, while 10% of pharmaceutical research accounts for 90% of the global disease burden.  It should really be no surprise that the pharmaceutical industry is more focused on profits than universal accessibility to life-saving medicines. This is an industry comprised of businesses more motivated to develop financially lucrative medications than less expensive but more globally impacting medical solutions. How can we create a system compatible with the current pharmaceutical market will enable poor populations to obtain medical treatments, and encourage increased spending on researching and developing new medicines for the major global burden of disease? (more…)

Read Full Post »

Instead of prioritizing to develop safe drugs to combat third-world diseases like tuberculosis, malaria, and diarrhea, pharmaceutical companies are pouring their resources and money into developing what we call “lifestyle” drugs, drugs that target first-world problems.  As the aging population of America grows, more drugs are being developed to make us look younger and feel younger. Drugs are being developed to combat impotence, baldness, wrinkles, acne, and even more ridiculous, hangovers. These pharmaceutical companies constantly find niches in the market to develop drugs that target our society, instead of spending money in development of drugs which can save many lives in other countries. Only people living in poverty are afflicted with diseases, which are virtually eliminated in the United States. Although these diseases are not prevalent in the developed countries, an outbreak of these diseases will cost many lives because there are no new cures being developed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Finally, Indonesians will soon be more informed about the importance of rationalizing the use of antibiotics. Yayasan Orang Tua Peduli/Concerned and Caring Parents (YOP), a non-government organization formed in Jakarta Indonesia on November 2005, has proposed to engage and strengthen civil society organizations to address aspects of antibiotic resistance impacting child and maternal health in Indonesia. This proposal was presented to the ReAct, Action on Antibiotic Resistance Organization on the 23rd of March 2012 in Jakarta Indonesia. (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »