Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Health Systems’ Category

By Sherylle Estrellas

Across the world, many developed countries supply universal health care, allowing everyone the health coverage and service he or she needs at no or little cost to the consumer. Meanwhile, America, among the most developed and richest countries in the world, still has yet to implement an equitable and efficient health care coverage system. Although the Affordable Care Act means to improve the system, one can only wonder why it has taken so long for America to change its ways. Economist Victor Fuchs suggests a few reasons why.

(more…)

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

-By Selin Thomas

For more than two years, the Syrian conflict has been intensely growing in historic scale and scope, with the United Nations estimating more than 100,000 dead and millions displaced. In the last two weeks, the U.N. Security Council has been urged to act on humanitarian aid to Syria because the only achievement to come out of peace talks has been a cease fire in Homs, leaving many aid workers still risking their lives daily. Today, more than two million have fled the country, an estimated 4.25 million have been displaced within the country. (more…)

Read Full Post »

-By Michelle Tagerman

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), commonly known as ‘Obamacare,’ was recently implemented with the goals of making health insurance coverage more affordable by expanding coverage, controlling the spiraling costs of health care and making health care delivery more efficient (KFF, 2013). To do so, state health exchanges were created where people are able shop for health insurance. In addition, government subsidies to purchase insurance are available for the poor. By lowering the cost of health insurance, the law was aimed at making health care accessible to all uninsured or under-insured American citizens by providing government subsidies. Unfortunately, the act has failed to eliminate several health disparities, (Davis & Walter, 2011) as will be discussed. (more…)

Read Full Post »

-By Katherine Storer

Video: 4 Shocking Facts about US Healthcare http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dqLdFFKvhH4

As someone with a chronic illness the healthcare system is something I’ve had a lot of experience with. Since I was 9 years old I’ve never walked away from a doctor’s appointment feeling anything other than frustration. I was always met with endless hours waiting for late doctors, copious amounts of obscure tests, and never-ending stares of disbelief. I had large co- pays for each useless visit, expensive prescriptions, uncovered tests, and never any answers. I always knew it was a flawed system, but I never quite understood why. (more…)

Read Full Post »

-By Gabriella Glopes

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMEZB8QMkrw

 

Brazil is the world’s fifth largest country, with a population of over 200 million people. In the 1980s, a movement calling for democratization and improved social rights was taking place in Brazil. At the end of the county’s re-democratization in 1988, half of the population had no health coverage. This is when an initiative for a universal public health system began and in 1988 the Unified Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde, SUS) was implemented. Twenty years after its establishment, more that 75% of the country’s population rely completely on it for health care coverage.1 (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Alexandra Desir

In this new age of sexual exploration and desensitization, erectile dysfunction is just another topic that has made its way out of the confines of the doctor’s office and into our living rooms. The average person watching television for an hour is subjected to at least five advertisements for drugs like Viagra and Cialis. I have become so accustomed to constantly being bombard by these commercials that I rarely ever notice them anymore. However, I couldn’t help but take notice of a tweet with the words “Medicare”, “overpaying”, and “erectile dysfunction” all in the same sentence. (more…)

Read Full Post »

By Enya O’Riordan

Last week, Harvard’s World Health News featured an article pulled from The Atlantic with the lead stating, “Over the last decade in Rwanda, deaths from HIV, TB, and malaria dropped by 80 percent, maternal mortality dropped by 60 percent, life expectancy doubled – all at an average health care cost of $55 per person per year.”  This is astounding news coming from the sub-Saharan nation, whose name is still synonymous with the devastating 1994 genocide that killed nearly 1 million people.  Following the genocide Rwanda was essentially left with a “clean slate[1]” on which it has built an incredible primary health care system, as well as instituted a program of universal healthcare with a focus on vulnerable populations.  As the author correctly points out, “for Rwanda, health equity is both a matter of ethics and epidemiology.”  This surge in availability and quality of medical care has also pulled thousands of Rwandans out of extreme poverty, and tripled the GDP per capita over the last decade.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »