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By Hannah Vanbenschoten

For Sara Stulac, a pediatric doctor from Rwanda, treating a young girl with a tumor the size of a cauliflower on her face was not what she expected her first experience with a patient to look like. In 2005, when the young girl came to Dr. Stulac, it was clear an oncologist was needed; unfortunately, Rwanda did not have one. The girl’s father had tried traditional healing remedies and local doctors, but the tumor grew to the point where Dr. Stulac needed to recruit satellite help from an American oncologist in order to save the girl’s life. Continue Reading »

Polio-Endemic Pakistan

By Heba Ijaz

Since Nigeria was declared endemic-free last year, Pakistan has become one of two remaining countries where polio is still an endemic viral infection.

Poliomyelitis is a highly infectious disease caused by the poliovirus that primarily affects children. The virus spreads mainly through the fecal-oral route, although transmission through oral and nasal secretions can also occur. It resides mainly in the throat and intestines, and in certain cases, can enter the bloodstream to invade the brain and spinal cord, leading to paralysis. Contaminated water and food sources along with poor personal hygiene are significant contributors to polio transmission. Two types of vaccines are available today: Oral Polio Vaccine (OPV) is a live attenuated version and Intravenous Polio Vaccine (IPV) is an inactivated version. Continue Reading »

By Sally Bohrer

In Africa, only three countries (Cape Verde, South Africa, and Tunisia) have legalized abortion. In the other fifty-one countries, abortion rights vary. None have completely outlawed abortion, as all African countries allow abortions to save the mother’s life, but most do not allow abortions in any other circumstances, even in the case of rape or incest. (For a full list of abortion rights by country, visit: http://www.theguardian.com/global-development/ng-interactive/2014/oct/01/-sp-abortion-rights-around-world-interactive). Continue Reading »

By Benjamin Castro

Condoms cannot cure Africa. They should not be at the forefront of HIV/AIDS prevention programs, nor should they be considered a top-priority.

These statements stand diametrically opposed to accepted conventional prevention strategies proposed by western nations. Many organizations, UNAids for instance, state that condoms should be at the vanguard of the continental struggle to prevent HIV/AIDS in Africa. Anything contrary to this statement is often labeled as ignorant, misguided, or a product of ultra-right wing radicalism, often religious. In a word, anti-scientific. However, Dr. Edward Green, who served as the director of  the AIDS Prevention Project at Harvard University as well as a member of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS (amongst many other positions), would agree with those statements. He provocatively states that condom use, while managing marginal amounts of risk in preventing HIV/AIDS, does not at all address the risky behavior which ought be the focus of prevention strategies. Continue Reading »

By Polina Ukrainets

As a student of psychology and public health and as someone that grew up in Baltimore, I see the issue of addiction as an extremely important one. For decades there have been debates on how to handle addiction and whether it is a problem of criminal justice or of public health. Lately, and fortunately, there have been increasing attempts to make it the latter. Continue Reading »

By Savannah Keller

When we think about modern pharmaceutical products, we look across the Charles River to the biotech companies that are developing cutting-edge drugs to combat rare clinical diseases. When we think about the burden of bacterial disease, we feel safe that simple antibiotics will keep us protected from such infections. Thus, our fears are averted towards the more complex viruses such as HIV and Malaria; a reasonable mindset due to the higher global death toll attributed to these viruses. But what will happen to us all when the basic antibiotics we so heavily take for granted stop working? Continue Reading »

By Dionna Joynes

If you couldn’t tell from the title of this blog post, then I will warn you all now. The topic of this post is HIGHLY disturbing in the way that it violates basic human rights, encourages the degradation of young future women in the long term, uses the face of culture and purity as a wayward choice to control the girls in specific communities, and it may even cause for a closer look at the health care providers you and your family use, So, for those of you who don’t know, this post is about Female Genital Mutilation (FGM), also known as FGC, Female Genital Circumcision. A short definition of what this process implies is, intentional injury to female genital organs for non medical purposes. This process has occurred for at least a couple centuries, at the very least. As I researched the topic of FGM, there were many things that came up that interested, as well as disgusted me. As a Health Science/Public Health student, I always try to remain open minded and non judgmental for new ideas that are completely different from the ones I grew up on. However, the practice of FGM, in my opinion, should signal for a global emergency or call of action. Continue Reading »